Sunday, December 26, 2010

Tuesday, December 21, 2010

Tuesday, December 14, 2010

Why Cloud Computing is the Best Thing That Ever Happened to Mac Development

starCult of Mac
December 13, 2010 5:30 AM
by Pete Mortensen

Why Cloud Computing is the Best Thing That Ever Happened to Mac Development

This past week finally saw the unveiling of Google’s long-awaited Chrome OS. Surprising few to none, the big revelation is that Chrome the browser is actually the entire operating system. Using cloud web applications, it will be possible to run a bunch of desktop-ish apps on a Chrome-based netbook at home, then go to work, fire up Chrome on Mac or Windows on your work laptop, and have the same experience there. Pretty snazzy stuff.

It’s yet another take on what cloud-based consumer computing could be (insert “network computing” if you’d like to relive 1996), an heir to the promise of Java and so many others. And it looks to have some legs, even if we’re still quite some ways from seeing commercially available hardware ready to run on it. Many developers will create apps for the platform, and its write-once, read-anywhere (WOMA!) promise is mighty seductive. It would be very easy to imagine a world in which no one develops for traditional desktop operating systems anymore, except for professional applications like video editing and design work. Sounds like bad news for Apple, right?

Not exactly. In fact, the wide proliferation of cloud applications with addressable APIs is just about the best thing that’s ever happened to Mac development since the launch of OS X. Increasingly, our data does live in the cloud, in addition to on our hard drives. But that doesn’t mean we need to interact with it out there. The iOS app ecosystem is clear evidence of that. Nearly all of them provide a nice, native interface to a cloud-based data set that can be addressed through a browser but isn’t as nice inside of one.

The same can be true for the Mac. Even as the web has eroded a lot of the traditional functions of the desktop OS, there is still a burning need for great UI that the vast majority of web apps, even Chrome, can’t deliver upon. I know that an increasing number of my favorite Mac apps are largely front ends for a far more complex web-based back end. MarsEdit for blogging, Reeder for RSS, Tweetie for Twitter, iCal for scheduling and others. In fact, the more successful ChromeOS becomes at getting people into the cloud, the more opportunities for native Mac clients there might turn out to be.

If anything, the ubiquity of the web has clarified what the most important user tasks are: social media, e-mail, web publishing, research, sharing of all kinds, rich media downloads. Now it’s incumbent on Mac developers to build beautiful and elegant ways to interact with those data sets. The coming of the Mac App Store is not a sign that our Macs will soon be locked down to Apple’s draconian standards. If anything, it will bring a tidal wave of great applications from under-appreciated developers. The coming of the cloud will be downright sunny in Cupertino.

Image via Conceivably Tech

Opinions Top stories Apple chrome cloud developers google Mac

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Green Army Man - Probably the Best Costume Ever

starmclasen's posterous reading list
December 13, 2010 1:40 PM

Green Army Man - Probably the Best Costume Ever

  Posted by Ozan Sakin

What would you NOT do, if you were so green?

via Likecool 

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Monday, December 13, 2010

The more I read about T.H. White, author of *The Once and

starBlog of a Bookslut
December 13, 2010 1:13 PM
by Jessa Crispin

The more I read about T.H. White, author of *The Once and

The more I read about T.H. White, author of The Once and Future King and The Goshawk, the more I like the fella. From The Book of English Magic:

He lived a simple life in a small cottage, where he taught himself falconry and looked after an unusual collection of pets. Tall, with a powerful beard, he must have been an eccentric character. One story relates how his cottage was visited by a Jehovah's Witness collecting for their church. 'I am Jehovah!' roared White. 'How much have we made?'"

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Saturday, December 11, 2010

Monday, December 6, 2010

If web browsers were celebrities [infographic]

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December 5, 2010 7:12 PM

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Robin just checked in

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December 5, 2010 11:11 PM

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Friday, November 19, 2010

Friday, November 5, 2010

Adventures in Epithetymology

starAbout Urban Legends
November 3, 2010 1:24 AM

Adventures in Epithetymology

Certain types of manure used to be transported (as everything was back then) by ship. In dry form it weighs a lot less, but once water (at sea) hit it, it not only became heavier, but the process of fermentation began again, of which a byproduct is methane gas. Methane began to build up below decks and the first time someone came below at night with a lantern, BOOOOM! Several ships were destroyed in this manner before it was discovered what was happening.

After that, the bundles of manure were always stamped with the term "S.H.I.T.," which meant to the sailors, "Ship High In Transit."

Or maybe not...

More:
Origin of the F-Word
History of "The Finger"
The True Meaning of "Dork"

Adventures in Epithetymology originally appeared on About.com Urban Legends on Wednesday, November 3rd, 2010 at 08:24:11.

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Wednesday, November 3, 2010

Friday, October 29, 2010

Happy Halloween

Foreboding by Skywalker Sound  
Download now or listen on posterous
Foreboding.mp3 (1223 KB)

The reconstructive surgery went great
Boo!!

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Tuesday, October 19, 2010

Wednesday, October 13, 2010

Bad van

No bone

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Sunday, October 10, 2010

Speedtest.net The Global Broadband Speed Test

Test your Internet connection bandwidth to locations around the world with this interactive broadband speed test http://www.speedtest.net

from the iMac
+--------------------------------------------------------+
Michael Clasen
mclasen@gmail.com
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Saturday, October 9, 2010

Speedtest.net iPhone Result

Test Date: October 9, 2010 8:37 PM
Connection Type: WiFi
Server: Palo Alto, CA
Download: 14.10 Mbps
Upload: 6.78 Mbps
Ping: 73 ms

External IP: 173.164.225.209
Internal IP: 192.168.0.4
Latitude: 37.8874
Longitude: -122.0870

A detailed image for this result can be found here:

Ookla operates Speedtest.net using a massive global infrastructure to minimize the impact of Internet congestion and latency. With over a million tests performed every day across hundreds of servers, Speedtest.net is the ultimate resource for bandwidth testing and related information. Visit it on your computer today to find out why.


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Tuesday, October 5, 2010

The Chokehold of Calendars

starA Whole Lotta Nothing
October 5, 2010 1:15 PM
by Matt Haughey

The Chokehold of Calendars

Meetings may be toxic, but calendars are the superfund sites that allow that toxicity to thrive. All calendars suck. And they all suck in the same way. Calendars are a record of interruptions. And quite often they’re a battlefield over who owns whose time.

via weblog.muledesign.com

That's a glorious intro sentence, worth quoting here for posterity.

technology

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Thursday, September 30, 2010

“Walk Like an Egyptian”: The Bluegrass Cover [Video]

there is just something about this song that says eeeejipshun

“Walk Like an Egyptian”: The Bluegrass Cover [Video]

Geekosystem 9/27/10 12:29 PM Robert Quigley Uncategorized Bluegrass The Bangles The Cleverly Trio The Cleverlys Walk Like An Egyptian

Cover of The Bangles’ “Walk Like an Egyptian” by West Virginia-based bluegrass act The Cleverly Trio; even better than it sounds.

(via Neatorama | Band Website)

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Wednesday, September 29, 2010

Researchers Test Space Beer

starSlashdot - real science at work
September 29, 2010 4:05 PM
by samzenpus

Researchers Test Space Beer

With space tourism becoming a real possibility in the near future, brewers are trying to figure out how to provide a good beer in space. To this end, a non-profit space research corporation Astronauts4Hire will begin testing an Australian brew created to be enjoyed in microgravity. From the article: "In the past, NASA has also sponsored studies on space beer, and whether or not the popular beverage can be brewed in space. Under current policies, however, alcohol remains forbidden on the International Space Station."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

space

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Monday, September 27, 2010

The Unseen Sea from Likecool

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September 27, 2010 12:45 PM

The Unseen Sea from Likecool

  Posted by clementine

Here is a collection of time lapses that Simon Christen took around the San Francisco.

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Saturday, September 25, 2010

Ninjabread cookies

ahhh hah!

Ninjabread cookies

Boing Boing 9/23/10 10:45 PM Cory Doctorow cookie food happymutants maker ninja

Instructables user Jayefuu likes the EpicWinFTW ninjabread cookie makers, but wanted to try his hand a DIY version. Now Jayefuu has shared the results, which are damned impressive.

Ninjabread Men (Thanks, Fipi Lele!)

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Tuesday, September 21, 2010

App of the Day for September 21st, 2010

Search looks good.

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From: App of the Day <contact@appoftheday.com>
Date: September 21, 2010 6:01:48 AM PDT
Subject: App of the Day for September 21st, 2010

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